Grappling

Eye Gouge (Damage 0.25/simple)

When an attacker uses this attack, they gouge at the eyes. Though this attack does not do much damage. It does cause an extreme amount of pain. If the attacker does 5 damage then the eye is ruined. The target number of this attacks depends if the victim if grappled or not. If they are grappled the target is 4, else it is 5. The defender must make a Will roll with a number of successes equal to the number of success rolled by the attacker.

Face Attacks (Damage 0.25/simple)

Face Attacks include grabbing hair or ears and tearing. It is a very painful maneuver and useful in breaking grapples. The target number of this attacks depends if the victim if grappled or not. If they are grappled the target is 4, else it is 5. If this attack does 5 damage then, the grabbed part of the face is ripped off. For every two successes, the defender will have 1 penalty die until the wound is healed.

Head Butt (Damage 1/simple)

The head butt allows you to damage an opponent with your head without hurting yourself. For every 1 that is rolled, the attacker will injure themselves. This maneuver can be used while grappled without the 2 penalty dice.

Neck Snap (Damage: 10/complex)

The Neck Snap is only taught in commando schools. It is done by grabbing the neck and head of an opponent and twisting quickly, thus snapping the neck. It is almost never tried in combat.

Single Leg Takedown (Damage: 0/complex)

The single leg takedown (often shortened to single leg or single) involves grabbing one of the legs of the opponent, usually with both hands, and using the position to force the opponent to the ground. Succesfully executing this takedown will result in the combatants on the ground with the attacker on the top. Each two extra successes give the attacker a bonus die on the next attack.

Double Leg Takedown (Damage: 0/complex)

The double leg takedown (colloquially simply known as a double leg or even double) involves grabbing the opponent with both arms around the opponent’s legs while keeping the chest close to the opponent, and using this position to force the opponent to the ground. Succesfully executing this takedown will result in the combatants on the ground with the attacker on the top. Each two extra successes give the attacker a bonus die on the next attack.

Sprawl (Damage: 0/complex)

A sprawl is a martial arts and especially wrestling term for a defensive technique that is done in response to certain takedown attempts, typically double or single leg takedown attempts. The sprawl is performed by scooting the legs backwards, so as to land on the upper back of the opponent attempting the takedown. Successfully sprawling will result in both combatants on the ground and the defender having a bonus die for every two extra successes.

Arm Locks (Damage: 5/complex)

In grappling, an armlock is a single or double joint lock that hyperextends, hyperflexes or hyperrotates the elbow joint and/or shoulder joint. An armlock that hyperflexes or hyperrotates the shoulder joint is referred to as a shoulder lock, and an armlock that hyperextends the elbow joint is called an armbar. Depending on the joint flexibility and integrity of a person, armlocks that hyperrotate the shoulder joint can also hyperrotate the elbow joint, and vice versa. Damage as a result of this move is capped at 1/4 of the defender’s hit points. If this point is reached, the defender cannot use that arm any more. Armlocks are always defended by S-3 of the defender.

This type of lock may also be used as a pain submission hold. In this case, the attacker does not actually damage the opponent. In this case, the attacker rolls for the submission. The defender must then roll a Will roll gaining the same number of successes as the attacker achieved. If they do not, then they submit (at least until the hold is removed). If they achieved the same number of success is greater then they do not submit, but receive two penalty dice (on top of the 2 for being grappled) to any maneuver. On their next action, the attacker can decide to either keep the submission attempt or do damage to the limb.

Leg Locks (Damage: 5/complex)

A leglock is a joint lock that is directed at joints of the leg such as the ankle, knee or hip joint. A leglock which is directed at joints in the foot is sometimes referred to as a foot lock and a lock at the hip as a hip lock. Leglocks are featured combat sports and martial arts such as Sambo, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, mixed martial arts, Shootwrestling and submission wrestling, but are banned in some sports featuring joint locks such as Judo. Damage as a result of this move is capped at 1/3 of the defender’s hit points. If this point is reached, the defender cannot use that leg any more. Leg locks are always defended by S-2 of the defender.

This type of lock may also be used as a pain submission hold. In this case, the attacker does not actually damage the opponent. In this case, the attacker rolls for the submission. The defender must then roll a Will roll gaining the same number of successes as the attacker achieved. If they do not, then they submit (at least until the hold is removed). If they achieved the same number of success is greater then they do not submit, but receive two penalty dice (on top of the 2 for being grappled) to any maneuver. On their next action, the attacker can decide to either keep the submission attempt or do damage to the limb.

Compression Lock

A compression lock (also known as a muscle lock, muscle slicer or muscle crusher) is a grappling hold which causes severe pain by pressing a muscle into a bone. A compression lock can cause a joint lock in a nearby joint when it is applied by squeezing a limb over a fulcrum. A forceful compression lock may damage muscles and tendons, and if accompanied by a joint lock, may also result in torn ligaments, dislocation or bone fractures. Compression locks can be used as pain compliance holds, and are sometimes featured in combat sports as submission holds. Damage as a result of this move is capped at 1/5 of the defender’s hit points. If this point is reached, the defender cannot use that muscle any more.

This type of lock may also be used as a pain submission hold. In this case, the attacker does not actually damage the opponent. In this case, the attacker rolls for the submission. The defender must then roll a Will roll gaining the same number of successes as the attacker achieved. If they do not, then they submit (at least until the hold is removed). If they achieved the same number of success is greater then they do not submit, but receive two penalty dice (on top of the 2 for being grappled) to any maneuver. On their next action, the attacker can decide to either keep the submission attempt or do damage to the muscle.

Choke Holds

A chokehold or stranglehold (in budo referred to as shime-waza, ??, “constriction technique”) is a grappling hold that strangles the opponent, and leads to unconsciousness or even death. Chokeholds are practiced and used in martial arts, combat sports, self-defense, law-enforcement and in military hand to hand combat application. They are generally considered superior compared to brute-force manual strangling, which usually requires a large disparity in physical strength to be effective. Instead of simply using the fingers or arms to attempt to crush the neck, chokeholds effectively use leverage such as figure-four holds or collar holds that use the clothes to assist in the strangle. Depending on the reaction of the victim, it may compress the airway, interfere with the flow of blood in the neck, or work as a combination of the two. Regardless of who the opponent is, a well applied blood choke leads to unconsciousness in 3-5 seconds, while a poorly applied choke can take upwards of thirty seconds to render the opponent unconscious. If released, the subject usually regains consciousness in double the time the choke was applied after he had blacked out. Each success with this skill reduces a defender’s C by 1. Once the defender’s C has been reduced to zero, they pass out.

Shoulder Throw (Damage: 2/complex)

The shoulder throw is a specialty of judo that has been transmitted into the techniques of multiple martial arts systems. The shoulder throw is so called because it leverages an opponent over your shoulder. There are dozens of variations but all of them share the same basic throwing mechanics. Successfully throwing the defender will result in the defender on the ground and the attacker having a bonus die for every two extra successes.

Hip throw (Damage: 1/complex)

The hip throw is another kind of fundamental wrestling throw. An opponent gets his hip lower than the center of gravity of his opponent. Using the hip to both destabilize and leverage the opponent, the thrower can easily slam the opponent to the ground. Judo calls these throws Koshi Waza and akido calls it koshinage. Look for hip throws in all forms of wrestling to better understand throwing techniques. Successfully throwing the defender will result in the defender on the ground and the attacker having a bonus die for every two extra successes.

Sacrifice throw (Damage: 1/complex)

Sacrifice throws are a more risky but very effective category of throwing that calls for the aggressor to use his body weight to destabilize, pull or push the opponent to the ground in a way that brings both wrestlers down. Sacrifice throws are extremely common in mixed martial arts, though you can see this kind of throw in all forms of wrestling.Successfully throwing the defender will result in both combatants on the ground with the defender grappled and the attacker having a bonus die for every two extra successes.

Leg throw (Damage: 1/complex)

Leg throws are similar to trips. With a trip, the attacker sweeps the foot away from the defender causing them to fall. In a leg throw the attacker moves the body of the defender over the attacker’s outstretched leg. Successfully throwing the defender will result in the defender on the ground and the attacker having a bonus die for every two extra successes.

Pick-up throw (Damage: 2/complex)

In a pick-up throw the attacker lifts their opponents body vertically and throws the opponent over their own center of gravity while executing a back fall (usually accompanied by a back arch). Variations of the suplex are common in most forms of wrestling, and sometimes used in Mixed Martial Arts competition; in Judo the ura-nage throw is a version of the suplex, but it is classified as a sacrifice throw.Successfully sprawling will result in both combatants on the ground and the defender having a bonus die for every two extra successes.Successfully throwing the defender will result in both combatants on the ground with the defender grappled and the attacker having a bonus die for every two extra successes.